This year on Black Friday

We’re supporting the Make Friday Green Again initiative and we will not participate in the Black Friday Sales in order to promote a sustainable and responsible consumption.

Black Friday is encouraging over-consumption and over-production every year. The real cost of this day is social and environmental and the overproduction associated to it contributes to climate change according to the supporters of this initiative.

‘Make Friday Green Again’

The “Make Friday Green Again” initiative was started by Nicolas Rohr, one of the co-founders of the eco-friendly clothing company Faguo in France

“When people buy something, we pollute because of the carbon emissions that come from making that product, from using it and then getting rid of that product,”

Black Friday – bad for the environment?

Everything we buy doesn’t just cost money, it has an environmental cost too. This depends on how it was made, what it was made from, how far it’s been transported and what happens to it at the end of its life.

The argument from all the brands associated with this green initiative is that the less you buy, the smaller your environmental footprint will be. This can considerably change the way the climate is currently affected.

Dr Patsy Perry, a senior lecturer in marketing from the University of Manchester, said: “[Black Friday] is a great time to take advantage of discounts but it goes against what we’re trying to do with sustainability.

“I think, increasingly, we’ll see more businesses saying they don’t want to be part of this [Black Friday].”

Facts about Black Friday…

Black Friday is the busiest shopping day of the year, when many retailers run special promotions for 24 hours, to get people buying presents for Christmas.

It’s a concept which started in the US and takes place the day after the American holiday of Thanksgiving.

The savings can be so significant that it can crash websites and see shoppers queuing up days in advance for bargains.

It gets its name because it’s often the day many stores move “into the black” – which means they start making more money than they have to spend.

Source: BBC – Read More…